Plant studbooks; the connected aproach to ex-situ plant conservation.

Many years ago, as a teenager, I took a job working in my local zoo. Voluntarily at first and then as a member of staff; I was a zoo keeper. It was the job I had dreamed of doing since I had read the books of my all time conservation hero; Gerald Durrell.

It wasn’t long before I discovered that some of the animals at the zoo were there for the purpose of ex-situ (away from their natural habitat) conservation and that the goal for their being in captivity was to eventually build up enough animals to release back into their natural environment. All this was, and still is, managed through a studbooking system which was overseen by an organisation called the World association of zoos and aquariums (WAZA).

It seemed so practical to me that such schemes existed and I got actively involved in the studbook for the Red Squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris). I had, admittedly, been indoctrinated by the master of zoo animal conservation; Mr Durrell.

Squirrel_posingDecades later and I no longer work with animals but my passion for nature has not waned. Now my focus is plants and I am lucky to work with many endangered species. One thing, however, that has struck me is that there doesn’t seem to be that same ‘joined up’ approach to ex-situ conservation in the botanic garden and horticultural world.

Certainly plenty are doing amazing things to conserve the most threatened species of plants. Yet that community that works toward a shared goal for individual species is missing or at best ad-hock. When you speak with the horticulturists growing these threatened plant species they tell you that they know they need to be propagating more of the plants in question and that the garden they work for has brought the plants into cultivation for the purpose of protecting them. They also say that they haven’t got a pollination schedule or that all the plants that have been produced are clones of the parent plant. Few of the species grown have a known number of genetically distinct individuals in cultivation and often the provenance (the specific location a plant came from) isn’t known either.

I am certainly not saying that ex-situ plant conservation is still in the dark ages and with recent work done on species like the Sink Hole Cycad (Zamia decumbens) conservationists are starting to gain a much stronger insight into cultivated plant conservation genetics. I am saying that we need to take a leaf out of the WAZA book by starting to apply a worldwide, linked up approach to the matter in hand. The first studbook for an animal in captivity for conservation was set up in 1932 for the European Bison which puts our endangered flora over 80 years behind the world’s fauna.

The first steps are already being taken BGCI (Botanic Gardens Conservation International) already hold a database of the plants grown in botanic gardens wordwide, Montgomery botanical centre’s guidance on ‘Building living plant collections to support conservation‘ and schemes like the Plant Heritage‘s National Collections being taken on by international botanic garden organisations we are well on the way to a more collaborative method of international ex-situ plant conservation.

Piperales

I feel it’s time we took the next step!

We need a method of deciding what the priorities are for species that are part of ex-situ projects; a way of knowing where each individual is and a way of ensuring maximum genetic diversity within the worldwide ex-situ populations of a species. In short we need to be learning from the zoo world’s book and ‘studbooking’ plants.

I have my own ideas about how Plant studbooking could work but I am sure that solving this problem does not have a simple solution. I am also sure that a solution needs to be found as soon as possible if some of our most endangered species are to have a future.

 

Proud to hold a national collection

letterhead picOn 3rd September 2015 we were awarded National Plant Collection status for our collection of South East Australian Banksia species.

Banksia ericifolia

Banksia ericifolia ssp. ericifolia

The genus Banksia was first discovered in Botany bay, Australia, by Sir Joseph Banks, on Captain Cooks first voyage of discovery and introduced to British cultivation by him. These trees and shrubs are considered by many to be tender but this is often due to their intolerance of the phosphates that are found in modern fertiliser.
We first became interested in them whilst studying the fossil history of the family, proteaceae, to which they belong. We soon found out that the many of the Banksia species that come from the South East of Australia are very tolerant of the British climate when given the right soil conditions.
The collection currently holds plants of Banksia aemula, canei, collina, ericifolia ssp. ericifolia, integrifolia ssp. integrifolia, marginata, oblongifolia, paludosa ssp. paludosa, robur, serrata and spinulosa var. prostrata ‘Birthday candles’.

 

In search of Proteas; an easy start to our South African adventure.

After 14 hours, 3 excellent movies (thank-you Dame Helen Mirren) and absolutely no sleep we stepped off the plane into a country neither Ben nor I knew. We had in our minds what we expected and what we hoped for but after a life time of negative news reports we couldn’t help but feel a little concerned about what we may be letting ourselves in for. The concerns however were quickly put to one side when we were greeted by the most helpful taxi driver either of us had ever met. We were whisked off to our hotel – seeing little of the city in which we had landed.

waiting to board

Waiting to board

For practicality we had booked to stay at the Kirstenbosch Manor Guest House.  Owned and run by SANBI (South Africa National Biodiversity Institute) the guest house was built in 1914 and is surrounded by SANBI’s flagship gardens; Kirstenbosch.

Kirstenbosch Manor Guest House nestled into the top of the garden with Table Mountain in the background

Kirstenbosch Manor Guest House nestled into the top of the garden with Table Mountain in the background.

We arrived quite late and tired so didn’t really appreciate the beauty of the surroundings at the time but we woke in the morning to the sound of cicadas and an increadible view over the gardens and down to Cape Town and the sea beyond. We would need to make the most of the two more nights we had as guests of Kirstenbosch as this was going to be as luxurious as our trip would get.

the view from the guesthouse although the mist obscured Cape Town and the sea beyond

The view from the guesthouse; the mist obscuring Cape Town and the sea beyond.

Growing only native species (and a few historic non-native trees such as Oaks) Kirstenbosch is considered South Africa’s most beautiful garden. Nestled into the Table mountain hillside its slope creates the ideal environment to grow a huge range of South Africa’s native flora. We had hoped to wander around this garden in beautiful South African spring sunshine but the rain gods had other ideas and what we got was a very rare Cape Town thunderstorm.

An increadible stand of Cussonia paniculata (Araliaceae) not far from our room.

An increadible stand of Cussonia paniculata (Araliaceae) not far from our room.

That same morning we had arranged to meet up with our friend and Kirstenbosch’s wholesale nursery manager Cherise Viljoen for a tour of the garden and a look around the production nursery and Proteaceae propagation centre.  So, waterproofs on, we walked down through the gardens, trying not to get distracted on the way, to meet her.

Ben and Cherise on the Boomslang

Ben and Cherise on ‘the Boomslang’ as the thunderstorm passed by.

Laportia grossa a native stinging nettle that i took quite a shine too. It is quite a bit more stingy than our native nettle and certainly brought a tear to my eye!

Laportia grossa a native stinging nettle that I took quite a shine too. It is quite a bit more stingy than our native nettle and would really bring a tear to the eye!

An exhibition of full sized metal dinosaurs amongst the cycad grove. Some of these plants were centuaries old and are some of the most endangered living things on earth.

An exhibition of full sized metal dinosaurs amongst the cycad grove. Some of these plants were centuaries old and are some of the most endangered living things on earth.

I was really pleased to see the Welwitschia on show in the Botanical Society Conservatory

I was really pleased to see the Welwitschia on show in the Botanical Society Conservatory

But the ones behind the scenes were way more impressive!

But the ones behind the scenes were way more impressive! (Ben and Cherise are pretty impressive too!)

Behind the scenes in the Protea propagation centre

Behind the scenes in the Protea propagation centre

I really was not prepared for all that we saw. Normally able to at least identify the genus of the plant I am looking at; the flora left me totally stumped. We decided to call anything we didn’t know either ‘probably Asteraceae’ or ‘probably a pea’ as this is what things seemed to turn out to be when we further investigated them.

Knowltonia vesicatoria, I believe this species has now been sunk into the genus Anemone!

Knowltonia vesicatoria, I believe this has now been sunk into the genus Anemone!

 

Moraea sp (out of my depth here)

Moraea sp (out of my depth here)

Another Moraea sp. (again I just didnt know the species)

Another Moraea sp. (again I just didnt know the species)

 

Pelargonium sp ????????

Pelargonium sp ????????

Cheilanthes sp. we forgot to bring our guide to South African fern id!

Pellaea sp. we forgot to bring our guide to South African fern id!

There were however lots of Proteaceae to see and we spent some time honing our id skills in preparation for the field.

Leucospermum reflexum var. luteum with the cliffs of Table Mountain.

Leucospermum reflexum var. luteum with the cliffs of Table Mountain.

Protea rubropilosa

Protea rubropilosa

Leucospermum formosum

Leucospermum formosum

Leucospermum mundii

Leucospermum mundii

Leucadendron argenteum endemic to the slopes of Table Mountain

Leucadendron argenteum endemic to the slopes of Table Mountain

Our first day ended in dinner with, the man that pushed so hard to make this all possible for us, Rupert Koopman and his lovely, and at the time heavily pregnant, wife Flo;  an evening of amazing Italian food, the best of company and lots of talk of how horticulture can help plant conservation. A very perfect ease into our adventure.

NB: A huge congratulations to Flo and Rupert on the birth (since our return home) of Amelia #Fynbosbaby!